SIMPLE WAYS TO Deal With ‘Hurry Sickness’

Consider what’s truly time-sensitive and what can wait.

Treating every task like an emergency that must be handled ASAP is a recipe for chronic stress. Prioritize what actually needs to get done and move the other items to the back burner. Try thinking of time as more of a friend than an enemy. Excessive time urgency is a problem in thinking. Everyone has some pressure to get things done. However, if you consider everything is equally urgent, you’re likely to experience stress problems. Rethink your view of time, how you relate to it, and what is really important to you. Place events and tasks in proper perspective.

Carve out small windows of time for self-care. Then, gradually increase them as it becomes more comfortable.

When you’re dealing with hurry sickness, relaxing may not come easily at first. So start small: Instead of booking a weeklong vacation, try setting aside an hour on the weekend to go on a hike or curl up with a good book. Use this time to reconnect with things you enjoy, and let the feelings float by as you regenerate and do something enjoyable. Reading, talking, walking and meditation are all examples of ways we can relax in an enjoyable way.

Create an evening routine.

If you have a hard time turning your brain off at night, establish a nighttime routine that helps you wind down and ease into sleep. That might include a cup of tea, a warm shower, journaling or whatever feels calming to you. Sleep helps us feel regenerated and emotionally balanced but becomes the enemy of speed and, even worse, is harder to get when constantly anxious. Finding a p.m. routine that works to gradually switch us ‘off’ promotes better sleep quality and quantity, boosting both our recovery, our well-being and how focused we are the following day.

Give yourself time to think.

When you’re constantly bouncing from one task to the next, you get bogged down in minutiae, unable to see the bigger picture. Allowing time for deep thought may feel like a waste at first. It’s not exactly an action item you can cross off your to-do list. But it’s necessary if you want to work toward your larger goals.

Get support from loved ones.

Changing deeply ingrained behaviors isn’t easy, but you don’t have to do it alone. Ask your support system to point out when you’re falling into old habits and help you replace them with healthier ones. With the support of your family, your colleagues, and friends, you can build a support base that can help you identify your patterns and triggers, keep you accountable to slowing down and keep you from falling back into old habits. If it becomes a continual struggle, professional help is available to work with you.

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